RSS

Huntsville Depot

05 Jul

This photo of the Huntsville [Alabama] Depot, entitled,”Captured by Union Forces,” was published about 1962 in a local newspaper.  The caption under the photo says, “Huntsville’s railway depot, site of the capture of locomotives and railway cars by Federal troops 100 years ago, still stands.  Forces under Union Gen. Ormsby M. Miller cut the strategic Memphis and Charleston Railroad at Huntsville Friday, April 11, 1862.”

My mother intended to mail this clipping to my grandmother in Minnesota because she sometimes visited Alabama by train, and our family picked her up at this depot on those much-awaited visits.  Built in the 1850s by the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, the Huntsville Depot not only served the public with passenger train service, but also served as the company’s corporate offices for its eastern division.  It boasted a large and lavish lobby that was used as a waiting area for passenger train travel.

The depot opened in 1860 shortly before the Civil War began.  During the 1862 capture, the Union soldiers not only took control of a very strategic point on the rail line, but they also detained Confederates as prisoners and kept them on the third floor.  One of the most fascinating scenes inside the depot today is the wall of graffiti left by those Confederate prisoners!

The U.S. government returned the depot to the Memphis & Charleston Railroad in disrepair after the Civil War, but the company was able to eventually resume its passenger service after a period of rebuilding.  Many greetings and goodbyes took place here over the years.  Passenger service at the Huntsville Depot ended in 1968.  It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage in 2002.  The depot now serves as a transportation museum and a symbol of Huntsville’s historic growth from a small cotton town to a center of space technology.

Huntsville Depot in 2010

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , , ,

4 responses to “Huntsville Depot

  1. Patricia Black

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 at 10:03 pm

    I live in Decatur. It’s nice to see local photographs.

     
    • southernfolkfinder

      Friday, July 13, 2012 at 11:36 pm

      I hope to add more local photographs and articles in the future. Thanks for stopping by!

       
  2. Joanne Schleier

    Monday, October 21, 2013 at 11:32 pm

    From one genealogist to another… THANK YOU… for posting this! I am researching my GGG grand uncle, Oliver Duncan McVicker, who was one of the prisoners captured here and, in particular, a picture of the depot. I’m in GA, so I may just have to come and check out the writing on the wall for myself!

     
    • Angela Lucas

      Friday, November 22, 2013 at 11:12 pm

      Thanks for posting this, Joanne. Interesting things happen when you make a personal connection with a place. I hope you will visit Huntsville to check out the writing on the wall, and just stand for a few quiet moments in the room where your ancestor was held prisoner.

       

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

 
hisXmark

researching the lives of Edward Maddox's descendants in America

DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy

Discovering Your Ancestors - One Gene at a Time

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Genealogist's Daughter

#thegenealogistsdaughter

Renegade South

histories of unconventional southerners

Cym Doggett

Metals and pastels

Genealogy Certification: My Personal Journal

a journal about my experiences becoming a certified genealogist

Angela Lucas, Professional Genealogist

Moore Genealogy

Fun With Genealogy

whoquest

…..who made it, who owned it, who is it?

The Shy Genealogist

Researching Russell Co, Kentucky

Remembering the Shoals

The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Locksands Life

Thoughts of a Happy Nerd

Maggie's Genealogy Service

Connecting the “Roots” and “Leaves” of Your Family Tree

Smoky Mountain Family Historian

Angela Lucas, Professional Genealogist

Planting the Seeds

Genealogy as a profession

%d bloggers like this: